Vocabulary - Growing up

Vocabulary

9 Colors Named After People

BY BESS LOVEJOY MARCH 12, 2019

Alice Roosevelt—for whom Alice Blue is named—in 1902
Alice Roosevelt—for whom Alice Blue is named—in 1902FRANCES BENJAMIN JOHNSTON, LIBRARY OF CONGRESS/WIKIMEDIA // PUBLIC DOMAIN

Throughout history, a variety of famous people have lent their names to shades of brilliant blue, shocking purple, grassy green, muddy brown, and other hues. While many of these figures are artists who were known for using or developing these hues, other color eponyms come from the scientists who invented them or those who loved to wear them. Consider this list the place where the history books meet the artist’s palette.

1. ALICE BLUE

A pale azure blue named for Alice Roosevelt Longworth, daughter of Theodore Roosevelt, who was known for wearing gowns of the color and thus sparking a trend for it. (She was also known for smoking in public and other forms of mischief-making, leading her father to declare: “I can either run the country or I can attend to Alice, but I cannot possibly do both.”) Her ice-blue dresses inspired the song “Alice Blue Gown” by Joseph McCarthy and Harry Tierney, which premiered in the 1919 Broadway musical Irene. (“I once had a gown that was almost new / Oh, the daintiest thing, it was sweet Alice Blue / With little forget-me-nots placed here and there / When I had it on, I walked on air.”)

2. YVES KLEIN BLUE

Visitors look at 'Monochrome Blue, without title' (1960) by French artist Yves Klein

Visitors look at Monochrome Blue, without title (1960) by French artist Yves KleinTHOMAS LOHNES/AFP/GETTY IMAGES

The artist Yves Klein was interested in art as transcendence, and he’s perhaps best known for painting monochromes in a brilliant ultramarine meant to suggest the infinity of sea and sky. (As Klein once explained, “Blue has no dimensions, it is beyond dimensions.”) In 1960, he registered a formula for the color—known as IKB, or International Klein Blue—with the French government; the formula relied on ultramarine pigment mixed with a synthetic resin that wouldn’t dilute the color.

During his “blue period,” Klein exhibited only blue paintings and objects, releasing a thousand and one blue balloons into the sky in Paris to celebrate one show, and serving gin, Cointreau, and blue-dye cocktails at another. Don’t copy that last idea, mixologists: everyone who drank them peed blue for days.

3. TITIAN RED

Visitors look at a painting by Renaissance master Titian in Rome

Visitors look at a painting by Renaissance master Titian in RomeGABRIEL BOUYS/AFP/GETTY IMAGES

A person with red hair is sometimes said to be a Titian, after the great 16th century Venetian painter who was notably fond of painting redheads. (Examples of such paintings include Bacchus and Ariadne and Noli me Tangere, now in London’s National Gallery.) In the 1960s, redheaded Barbie dolls were officially known as “Titians.” More loosely, the term has come to mean any orange-red color, although people seem to love to debate exactly what shades count.

4. SCHEELE’S GREEN

Svenska Familj-Journalen, Wikimedia Commons // Public Domain

Arsenic-based green pigments were all the rage in the 19th century, coloring everything from hosiery to hats to children’s toys. The first such pigment on the scene was Scheele’s Green, discovered by Swedish chemist Carl Wilhelm Scheele in 1775. The vibrant yellow-green hue caught on, especially after it was discovered that arsenic also produced a variety of other greens, from deep emerald to pale peridot. Although Scheele and others knew how toxic these pigments were, that didn’t stop the colors from being used for clothing, candles, papers, playing cards, book-bindings, and sometimes even food. In perhaps the most famous example of its use, arsenic green wallpaper graced Napoleon’s last bathroom while he suffered through his exile on St. Helena, and some think the fumes caused by his long baths may have been what killed him.

5. ISABELLINE

José Reynaldo da Fonseca, Wikimedia Commons // CC BY 2.5

If true, this color’s origin story has to be the most off-putting in history. Once used to describe the pale champagne color of certain horse coats and bird feathers, the term Isabella-colored or isabelline is said (by no less than Isaac D’Israeli’s 1791 Curiosities of Literature) to come from Isabel of Austria, the devoted daughter of Philip II of Spain.

Supposedly, when Spain laid siege to the city of Ostend in 1601, Isabella vowed not to change her undergarments until the city was taken. She expected a speedy victory, but much to her dismay (and presumably that of everyone around her), the fighting continued for three years before Spain won.

The Oxford English Dictionary dismisses this origin story, noting that Isabella as a color is first noted in 1600, a year before the siege began. But linguist Michael Quinion notes that accounts in French, German, Spanish and Italian (where isabelline has a similar color meaning) refer to the earlier Queen Isabella of Castile (1451-1504) and the siege of Granada—which means the story might just be true, even if it’s about a different Isabella and a different set of 7-month-old dirty underwear.

6. FUCHSIA

Heinrich Füllmaurer, Wikimedia Commons // Public Domain

Here’s a more pleasant etymology: The vivid red-purple of fuchsia, the color, comes from fuchsia, the flower, which is in turn named for 16th-century German botanist Leonhart Fuchs. (His last name, by the way, comes from the German word for “fox.”) And if you think fuchsia and magenta are the same color, you’re closer than you might think: Magenta was originally an aniline dye named fuchsine, named after the fuchsia flower. The name was changed in 1859, the year it was patented, in honor of the French victory at the Battle of Magenta. That apparently helped the dye become a stunning success.

7. VANDYKE BROWN

Anthony van Dyck, Wikimedia Commons // Public Domain

This deep, warm, transparent brown was made with a high concentration of organic matter (basically: actual dirt), and was popular with the Old Masters. It was named for the innovative Flemish painter Anthony van Dyck, who often used the color in his paintings, and who also lent his name to an early photographic printing process—which also produced a brown color, but did not actually involve dirt.

8. PERKIN’S MAUVE

Wikimedia Commons // Public Domain

Like so many scientific discoveries, the invention of synthetic dyes happened by accident. In 1856, chemistry student William Henry Perkin, then only 18, was trying to find a new way to make quinine (a popular treatment for malaria, and the ingredient that still gives tonic water its slightly bitter taste). The experiment didn’t quite work as planned, but Perkin noticed some purple sludge left over in his flask after rinsing it with alcohol, and realized its potential.

His instincts were good: After Perkin patented his creation and began mass-producing it, the color swept England, becoming so popular that the magazine Punch condemned an outbreak of “the mauve measles.” The color was originally called aniline purple by Perkin, as well as Perkin’s purple or Perkin’s violet. The mauve part of “Perkin’s mauve” came a few years later thanks to the French, who named it after their word for the mallow flower.

9. HOOKER’S GREEN

Thomas Herbert Maguire, Wikimedia Commons // Public Domain

The warm, grassy “Hooker’s Green” is named for botanical illustrator William Hooker (1779–1832), who created a special pigment just to convey the exact green of leaves.

BONUS: MUMMY BROWN

A close-up of an Egyptian mummy head

A close-up of an Egyptian mummy headISTOCK.COM/IZANBAR

OK, it’s not a color named after one person, but a color named after many people—many dead people. First made in the 16th and 17th centuries, but a special favorite of the 19th century painters, this rich brown pigment was created by mixing both human and feline mummy crumbles with white pitch and myrrh. (Although we tend to think of them as protected antiquities today, people in centuries past often considered mummies just another natural resource.)

In part because of its curious components, the pigment wasn’t the most stable in the world, and it fell out of favor once its origin story became better known. According to one biography, the Pre-Raphaelite artist Edward Burne-Jones gave his tube of Mummy Brown a funeral in his garden when he discovered where it came from. The pigment was sold into the 20th century, although if you see the name “mummy brown” used today, rest assured it contains no actual corpses. Probably.

A version of this list first ran in 2016.

Si quieres aprender inglés más rápido, contáctanos y te platicamos todo acerca de nuestra metodología única donde adaptamos nuestras clases 100% en inglés a tus habilidades más desarrolladas para que sea más sencillo y rápido para ti aprender inglés. Es tan efectivo que GARANTIZAMOS nuestro Curso de Inglés General. ¡Además este mes también puedes hacer el TEST DE INGLÉS ONLINE GRATIS para conocer tu nivel de inglés y recibir asesoría sobre cómo mejorarlo rápidamente. ¡INVIERTE EN TI ESTE 2019!

 

11 Words You Might Not Realize Come From “Love”

 

Mental Floss Original Article

The following list of words have a great connection to the word “LOVE”, so take a look at them and learn why they are related.

  1. BELIEVE
    In Old English, believe was geliefan, which traces back to the Germanic galaubjan, where laub is the root for “dear” (so “believe” is “to hold dear”). Laub goes back to the Proto-Indo-European root for “love,” leubh.
  2. FURLOUGH
    We got furlough from the Dutch verlof, which traces back to the same Germanic laub root as in believe. It is also related to the sense of leave meaning “allowance” or “permission” (“get leave,” “go on leave”). The “leave” in a furlough is given with pleasure, or approval, which is how it connects back to love.
  3. FRIDAY
    Old English Frigedæg was named for Frigg, the Germanic goddess of love (and counterpart to the Roman Venus). According to the OED, frīg was also a noun for “strong feminine” love.
  4. VENOM
    Venom comes from the Latin venenum, which shares a root with the love goddess Venus, and originally referred to a love potion.
  5. AMATEUR
    The root of amateur is Latin amare, “to love.” An amateur practices a craft simply because they love it.
  6. CHARITY
    The Latin caritas, which ended up as charity in English, was a different kind of love than amor, implying high esteem and piety, rather than romance and passion. It was used to translate the Ancient Greek agape, the word used in the New Testament to express godly love.
  7. PHILOSOPHY
    Greek had another word for love, philia, that—in contrast to agape and eros (sexual love)—meant brotherly or friendly love. It’s used in many classical compounds to signify general fondness or predilection for things. Philosophy is the love of sophos, wisdom.
  8. PHILANTHROPY
    This one means love of anthropos, humanity.
  9. PHILADELPHIA
    You might know it as the “city of brotherly love,” but you might not know that the tagline is right there in the name. It’s love for adelphos, brother.
  10. PHILIP
    The name Philip comes from the compound phil- + hippos, love of horses.
  11. ACIDOPHILUS
    Have you been taking acidophilus probiotic supplements for digestive health? It’s made from acid-loving bacteria, i.e., bacteria that easily take up an acid dye for viewing under the microscope.

This list originally ran in 2015.

Si quieres aprender inglés más rápido, contáctanos y te platicamos todo acerca de nuestra metodología única donde adaptamos nuestras clases 100% en inglés a tus habilidades más desarrolladas para que sea más sencillo y rápido para ti aprender inglés. Es tan efectivo que GARANTIZAMOS nuestro Curso de Inglés General. ¡Además este mes también puedes hacer el TEST DE INGLÉS ONLINE GRATIS para conocer tu nivel de inglés y recibir asesoría sobre cómo mejorarlo rápidamente. ¡INVIERTE EN TI ESTE 2019!

Contáctanos

¡Quiero aprender más rápido inglés!

¡Contáctanos y aprende inglés más rápido garantizado!

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

100 palabras de Navidad en inglés

Aprende más de 100 palabras navideñas en inglés con esta lista que tenemos para ti.

Comida

 

Candy cane – Bastón de caramelo

Cava – Cava

Champagne – Champaña

Chestnuts – Castañas

Christmas dinner – Cena de Navidad

Christmas basket – Cesta de Navidad

Cookie – Galleta

Eggnog – Rompope (con o sin licor)

Fruitcake – Pastel de frutas/Budín inglés

Gingerbread – Pan de jengibre

Gingerbread house – Casa de pan de jengibre

Gingerbread man – Hombre de pan de jengibre

Hot chocolate – Chocolate caliente

King Prawns – Langostinos

Marzipan – Mazapán

Pie – Pie. Receta de pie de manzana.

Polvorones – Polvorones. No existe una traducción al inglés, así que conservan su nombre en español.

Rosca de Reyes – Rosca de Reyes. No hay traducción y no es una costumbre en los países anglófonos.

Turkey – Pavo

Turron – Turrón. No hay traducción.

Nieve

Cabin in the Woods, Winter, Christmas Lights

 

Darwin Wiggett/Getty Images

 

Frosty – Escarchado

Ice – Hielo

Snow – Nieve

Snowball – Bola de nieve

Snowfall – Una nevada

Snowflake – Copo de nieve

Snowman – Hombre de nieve

Snowy – Nevado

Personajes navideños

Nutcrackers

 

Nutcrackers” (CC BY 2.0) by boyBacon

 

Angels – Ángeles

Baby Jesus – El niño Jesús

Elf – Duende

Elves – Duendes. Cómo escribir palabras en plural en inglés.

Family – Familia

Frosty the Snowman – Frosty el hombre de nieve. Protagonista de una canción popular navideña.

Grinch – El Grinch. Personaje navideño creado por Dr. Seuss

Guest – Invitado

Jack Frost – Padre Invierno

Jesus – Jesús

Joseph – José

Nutcracker – Cazcanueces

Rudolph – Rudolph el reno

Saint – Un santo

Santa’s helpers – Ayudantes de Santa Claus

Santa Claus – Santa Claus

Scrooge – Scrooge. Protagonista de la novela Cuento de Navidad de Charles Dickens.

Shepherds – Pastores

The Christmas Spirit – El Espíritu Navideño

Three Kings/Three Wise Men – Los Tres Reyes Magos

Virgin Mary – La Virgen María

Decoraciones navideñas

Living room decorated for Christmas

 

 dszc/Getty Images

 

Bells  – Campanas

Candle – Vela

Christmas tree – Árbol de Navidad

Decorations – Adornos / Decoraciones

Garland – Guirnalda

Lights – Luces

Ornament – Objeto de decoración

Ribbon – Listón

Regalos navideños

Boy opening gifts

 

Gary John Norman/Getty Images

 

Bow – Moño

Box – Caja

Coal – Carbón

Gift – Regalo

Present – Regalo

Santa’s list – Lista de Santa Claus

Toy – Juguete

Wrapping paper – Papel de envolver

Animales y plantas

Reindeer

 

Per Breiehagen/Getty Images

 

Goose – Ganzo

King Prawns – Langostinos

Pine tree – Pino

Pinecone – Cono

Reindeer – Reno

Tree – Árbol

Turkey – Pavo

Santa Claus

Santa Claus

 

 Andrew Burton/Getty Images

 

Chimney – Chimenea

Elf – Duende

Elves – Duendes

Grinch – El Grinch

North Pole – El Polo Norte

Santa’s helpers – Ayudantes de Santa Claus

Santa Claus – Santa Claus

Santa’s workshop – Taller de Santa Claus

Sleigh – Trineo

Los Reyes Magos

Ornamento de Navidad con siluetas de los Reyes Magos

 

 cstar55/Getty Images

 

Frankincense – Incienso

Gold – Oro

Myrrh – Mirra

Ropa

Christmas sweater

 

Steve Debenport/Getty Images

 

Boots – Botas

Ice skates – Patines de hielo

Gloves – Guantes

Jacket – Chamarra/Chaqueta

Mittens – Mitones

Scarf – Bufanda

Socks – Calcetines

Stockings – Calcetas

Sweater – Suéter

Verbos

The Winchester Choristers Go Ice Skating

 

 Matt Cardy/Getty Images

 

Buy – Comprar

Celebrate – Celebrar

Give – Dar

Receive – Recibir

Rejoice – Regocijar/Alegrar

Shopping – Comprando/Compras

Skate – Patinar

Unwrap – Desenvolver

Visit – Visitar

Wish – Deseo / Desear

Wrap – Envolver

Fechas

New Year's Eve in Times Square

 

Stephanie Keith/Getty Images

 

Christmas Day – Día de Navidad

Christmas Eve – Nochebuena

Christmas holidays – Las vacaciones de Navidad

December 28th – Día de los Santos Inocentes. En Estados Unidos se llama April Fool’s Day y se celebra el 1 de abril.

Holidays – Vacaciones

January 6th – Día de Reyes. No se celebra el día de Reyes en los países anglófonos.

New Year’s Day – Día de año nuevo

New Year’s Eve – Nochevieja

Vacation – Vacación

Winter – Invierno

Xmas – Abreviación de “Navidad”

12
de 15

Felicitaciones

Person writing christmas cards

 

 Dan Brownsword/Getty Images

 

Christmas card – Tarjeta de Navidad

Happy New Year! – ¡Feliz Año Nuevo!

Hug – Abrazo

Joy – Alegría

Love – Amor

Merry Christmas! – ¡Feliz Navidad!

Greetings – Felicitaciones

Canciones navideñas

Christmas carol singers

 

 Hulton Archive/Getty Images

 

Christmas carol – Villancico/Canto para pedir posada

Jingle Bells – Que suenen las campanas

Frosty the Snowman – Frosty el hombre de nieve

We Wish You a Merry Christmas – Te deseamos una feliz navidad

So This is Christmas – Así que esto es la Navidad

Santa Claus is Comming to Town – Santa Claus viene al pueblo

O Christmas Tree – O árbol de Navidad

Rudolph The Red Nose Reindeer – Rudolph el reno con la nariz roja

Silent Night – Noche Silenciosa

Let it Snow – Que nieve

All I Want for Christmas is You – Todo lo que quiero por Navidad eres tú.

Vocabulario religioso

Nativity scene

 

Panoramic Images/Getty Images

 

Angels – Ángeles

Baby Jesus – El niño Jesús

Bethlehem – La ciudad de Belén

Christian – Cristiano

Charity – Caridad

Crib – Cuna

Holy – adj. Santo

Hope – Esperanza

Jerusalem – Jerusalén

Jesus – Jesús

Joseph – José

Midnight Mass – Misa del gallo

Nativity scene – Un belén/pesebre

Saint – Un santo

Shepherds – Pastores

Spirit – Espíritu

Star – Estrella

The Star of Bethlehem – La estrella de Belén

Three Kings/The Three Wise Men – Los Tres Reyes Magos

Tradition – Tradición

Virgin Mary – La Virgen María

Otras tradiciones navideñas

Santa Claus getting a kiss under the mistletoe

 

 E. Dean/Getty Images

 

Mistletoe – Muérdago

Pageant – Desfile

Parade – Desfile

Party – Fiesta

Ritual – Ritual

Sales – Rebajas

Source: 100 palabras de Navidad en inglés y español

Si quieres aprender inglés más rápido, contáctanos y te platicamos todo acerca de nuestra metodología única donde adaptamos nuestras clases 100% en inglés a tus habilidades más desarrolladas para que sea más sencillo y rápido para ti aprender inglés. Es tan efectivo que GARANTIZAMOS nuestro Curso de Inglés General. ¡Además este mes también puedes hacer el TEST DE INGLÉS ONLINE GRATIS para conocer tu nivel de inglés y recibir asesoría sobre cómo mejorarlo rápidamente. ¡INVIERTE EN TI ESTE 2019!

10 English words that DON’T EXIST in Spanish!!!

Es muy común que cuando estamos aprendiendo un nuevo idioma queramos usar de referencia nuestra primer lengua, sin embargo hay algunas palabras que no existen en español y es por esta razón que se vuelve difícil traducir. Aquí podrás ver un vídeo donde se muestran 10 palabras del idioma inglés que no se pueden traducir literalmente al español porque NO EXISTEN.

 

 Original Source : Superholly https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=67mqkuDOU24

Si quieres aprender inglés más rápido, contáctanos y te platicamos todo acerca de nuestra metodología única donde adaptamos nuestras clases 100% en inglés a tus habilidades más desarrolladas para que sea más sencillo y rápido para ti aprender inglés. Es tan efectivo que GARANTIZAMOS nuestro Curso de Inglés General. ¡Además este mes también puedes hacer el TEST DE INGLÉS ONLINE GRATIS para conocer tu nivel de inglés y recibir asesoría sobre cómo mejorarlo rápidamente. ¡INVIERTE EN TI ESTE 2019!

Contáctanos

¡Quiero aprender más rápido inglés!

¡Contáctanos y aprende inglés más rápido garantizado!

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

6 Grammar Lessons Hidden in Christmas Songs

grammar lessons__cursosdeinglesmonterrey

Understand the grammar in your favorite carols.

1. Round yon virgin

The “round” in “Silent Night” might call up imagery of the soft, maternal kind, but in the phrase “round yon virgin,” it simply means “around.” “Yon” is an antiquated word for “that one” or “over there.” The meaning of the phrase in the song depends on the line before it. It should be understood in the context “all is calm, all is bright round yon virgin mother and child.” In other words “Everything is calm and bright around that virgin mother over there and her child.” In technical terms, “round yon virgin mother and child” is a prepositional phrase.

2. Troll the ancient Yuletide carol

Trolling a carol might sound like some obnoxious attempt to undermine it, but it’s actually a great way to get in the holiday spirit. According to the OED, one of the meanings of “troll,” in use since the 16th century, is “to sing in a full, rolling voice; to chant merrily or jovially.” It’s related to the sense of rolling, or passing around, and probably came to be used to mean singing because of rounds, where the melody is passed from one person to the next. The modern, obnoxious sense of troll comes from a much later importation from Scandinavian mythology. People have increasingly been changing this line to “toll the ancient Yuletide carol” (now over 17,000 hits on Google). Don’t let the trolls win! Let’s troll the trolls by dragging this word back to the cheery side!

3. The little Lord Jesus laid down his sweet head

“Away in a manger, no crib for a bed / The little Lord Jesus laid down his sweet head.” This line is a perfect storm of lay/lie confusion. The correct form here is “laid,” but it often gets changed to “lay,” and with good reason. “Laid” is the past tense of “lay,” which should be used here because the little Lord Jesus isn’t simply reposing (lying), but setting something down (laying), namely, his head.

If it were in the present tense, you could say he “lays down his sweet head.” But in the past tense “lay” is the form for “lie.” I know. It’s a rule that seems rigged just to trip people up. But here, it gets even worse, because the word right after “laid” is “down.” There’s a word ending with ‘d’ followed by a word beginning with ‘d.’ When you say “laid down,” it’s hard to tell whether that first ‘d’ is there or not. As a practical matter, both “lay” and “laid” sound exactly the same in this context. So you can fudge it when you sing it. Just be careful how you write it.

4. You better watch out, you better not cry

That’s right, Santa Claus is coming to town, so you better watch out. Or is it “you’d better watch out?” Many grammar guides advise that the proper form is “you’d better” because the construction comes from “you had better,” and it doesn’t make sense without the “had.” The problem is, it doesn’t make much sense with the “had” either, if you want to do a picky word-by-word breakdown.

Though the “had better” construction has been a part of English for 1000 years, it came from a distortion of phrases like “him were better that he never were born,” where “were” was a subjunctive (“it would have been better”) and “him” (or “me,” “you,” “us”) was in the dative case (“him were better” = “it would have been better for him”). People started changing the dative to the subject case (“he were better”) and then changed the “were” to “had.”

That was all hundreds of years ago. Then, in the 1800s, people started dropping the “had.” The grammar books of the late 1800s tried mightily to shore up the “had” (some even making up a rule from nowhere that it should be “would,” as in “he would better”), but these days the bare form is considered correct, if a bit casual for formal contexts. Clearly, “Santa Claus is Coming to Town” wants nothing to do with fancy formality. So “you better watch out” is the way to go.

5. With the kids jingle belling and mistletoeing

There is a lot of verbing going on in “It’s the Most Wonderful Time of the Year.” First, “With the kids jingle belling/And everyone telling you ‘Be of good cheer’,” and then, “There’ll be much mistletoeing/And hearts will be glowing when loved ones are near.” Of course, in a song, concessions to rhythm and rhyme need to be made, and sometimes this involves making up a few words. But the practice of turning nouns into verbs is as old as English itself. Many of our verbs started when someone decided to use a noun to stand for some verbal notion related to that noun. First we had “hammer,” and from that we made “hammering.” First we had “message,” and now we have “messaging.” Oil, oiling, sled, sledding, battle, battling. The meaning of the verb is built off some context involving the noun, which could be almost anything (pounding with a hammer, sending a message, putting oil on, riding a sled, engaging in a battle). So verbs for “ringing jingle bells” or “kissing under the mistletoe” aren’t so strange at all. At least no more strange than “gifting” or “dialoguing.”

6. God rest you merry, gentlemen

Notice the comma placement there? The gentlemen in this phrase are not necessarily taken to be merry already. It’s not “Hey, you! You merry gentlemen! God rest you!” It’s “Hey, you gentlemen over there! May God rest you merry!”

In Shakespeare’s time, “rest you merry” was a way to express good wishes, to say something like “peace and happiness to you.” Other versions were “rest you fair” or “rest you happy.” It came from a sense of “rest” meaning “be at ease,” which we still use in the phrase “rest assured.” In “God rest you merry,” “you” is the object of “rest,” so when people make the song sound more old-timey by substituting “ye” for “you,” they are messing up the original grammar because “ye” was the subject form.

Actually, that’s not quite true, because even in Shakespeare’s time, “ye” was sometimes used as the object form. However, if you want to go that way, you should be consistent with your pronouns and sing “God rest ye merry gentlemen/Let nothing ye dismay.” In the second line “you” is also an object, as in “Let nothing dismay you.”

So rest you merry this season, and enjoy your jingle belling, mistletoeing, and trolling.

Understand the grammar in your favorite carols.

from Mental Floss https://ift.tt/1bhkF4z

Si quieres aprender inglés más rápido, contáctanos y te platicamos todo acerca de nuestra metodología única donde adaptamos nuestras clases 100% en inglés a tus habilidades más desarrolladas para que sea más sencillo y rápido para ti aprender inglés. Es tan efectivo que GARANTIZAMOS nuestro Curso de Inglés General. ¡Además este mes también puedes hacer el TEST DE INGLÉS ONLINE GRATIS para conocer tu nivel de inglés y recibir asesoría sobre cómo mejorarlo rápidamente. ¡INVIERTE EN TI ESTE 2019!

Contáctanos

¡Quiero aprender más rápido inglés!

¡Contáctanos y aprende inglés más rápido garantizado!

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

15 Terrific Alternatives to “Hello” – Vocabulary

First impressions are important, so why be boring when there are so many other ways to greet a person and forge a unique connection. Celebrate World Hello Day by trying out a new salutation.

1. WHAT’S THE CRAIC?

How they say “What’s up?” in Ireland. The craic (pronounced “crack”) is the news, gossip, latest goings-on, or the fun times to be planned.

2. HOW HOPS IT?

Be classically cool with this late 19th-century slang for “How’s it going?”

3. AHOY

Add a little jaunty excitement by getting into pirate mode.

4. [HAT TIP]

Be the strong, silent type and forgo words entirely with an elegant tip of your hat.

5. THERE HE/SHE IS!

Make someone feel like the man or the woman of the hour.

6. CIAO

Feeling friendly and cosmopolitan? Ciao will set the mood. Add a kiss on each cheek for authenticity.

7. S.P.D.S.V.B.E.E.V.

Want to write a letter with a classical Latin feel? Open with this abbreviation for Salute plurimam dicit. Si vales, bene est, ego valeo. “Many greetings. If you’re well, then that’s good, and I’m well too.”

8. SALUTATIONS

Show off your verbal dexterity with this gentleman’s greeting.

9. GREETINGS

Or keep it simple and use the word that means just what it says.

10. HOWDY

Keep it casual, cowpoke, or get fancier with a full-on Howdydo?

11. ALOHA

Bring a little mellow sunshine to your interactions by greeting the Hawaiian way.

12. NAMASTE

Start with a show of respect. This peaceful greeting comes from the Sanskrit for “I bow to you.”

13. HOW’S TRICKS?

You’ve got to smile when you dust off this gem from the 1920s.

14. BREAKER, BREAKER

Open the conversation like a trucker on a CB radio.

15. WELL, LOOK AT YOU!

Reminiscent of the sweet way your grandma used to express how impressed she was with you. Why not spread the love around with this opening?

Source: 15 Terrific Alternatives to “Hello” | Mental Floss

40 Excellent E-Words To Enlarge Your Vocabulary

40 Excellent E-Words To Enlarge Your Vocabulary
The history of the letter E can be traced all the way back to an Egyptian hieroglyphic that probably depicted a praying or celebrating man, with the open horizontal lines of an “E” being the modern-day descendants of his arms or legs. Over time, this original pictogram simplified massively: the Phoenicians adopted it and made it into nothing more than a slanted, back-to-front, slightly elongated E-shape, which they used to represent their letter he. This in turn was rotated, truncated, and straightened up to form the Greek letter epsilon, E, and it’s from there (via Latin) that E as we know it ended up in English.

E is the most frequently used letter in the English language—in fact, it’s held the top spot in the English language ever since the Old English period [PDF]. It’s nearly 57 times more common than the least-used letter, Q, and is the most-used letter in a host of other languages, including French, German, Spanish, Dutch, Italian, and Latin. E accounts for around 11 percent of all the language you’ll ever use. Not only that, but you can expect it to begin just under four percent of all the words in a dictionary—including the 40 extra-special E-words explained here.

1. EAGGLE-BAGGLE

An old Scots dialect word meaning “to argue” or “to thrash out a bargain.” Derived from a local pronunciation of argle-bargle.

2. EARNEST MONEY

The cash used to secure a deal or a bargain? That’s earnest money.

3. EARTH-BATH

An 18th-century euphemism for a grave. To take an earth-bath meant to be buried. Coffins, meanwhile, were nicknamed eternity-boxes.

4. EASTIE-WASTIE

An old Scots dialect word for someone who can’t be relied upon. It literally means “east-west”—namely, someone who is inconstant, or changes like the wind.

5. EASYOZIE

An old English dialect word meaning “easygoing” or “laid back.”

6. EBRANGLE

A 17th-century word meaning “to shake violently.” Not to be confused with embrangle, which means “to confuse” or “to entangle.”

7. EBULLATE

We might use ebullience to mean “enthusiasm” or “liveliness,” but it literally means “boiling” or “boiling hot.” Derived from the same root, to ebullate is to boil, while the formation of bubbles in a boiling liquid is called ebullism.

8. EEL-SKINS

Nineteenth-century slang for very tight trousers. Tight shoes were known as excruciators.

9. EGG-BAG

An old Yorkshire dialect word for a pointless argument. Likewise, an egg-battle is someone who pushes other people to quarrel or argue.

10. EGGTAGGLE

An old Scots word meaning “the act of wasting time in bad company.”

10. EGGTAGGLE

An old Scots word meaning “the act of wasting time in bad company.”

11. ELBOW-CROOKER

Derived from the image of someone “crooking” (i.e. bending) their elbow to raise their hand to their mouth, an elbow-crooker is a drunk or a hard drinker. Whereas …

12. ELBOW-SHAKER

… an elbow-shaker is a prolific gambler, derived from the image of someone shaking dice.

13. ELENGE

If something or someone is elenge, then it’s remote, isolated, or lonely.

14. ELOZABLE

Derived from a French word meaning “praise,” if you’re elozable then you’re susceptible to flattery.

15. ELSEWHAT

Whereas elsewhere means “somewhere else,” elsewhat means “something else.” It’s one of a number of else words to have long fallen out of use in English, including elsewards (“heading towards somewhere else”), elsewhen (“at another time”), elsewhence (“from somewhere else”), and elsehow (“in some other way”).

16. ELT

To elt is simply to press or knead something, but elting-moulds are the ridges of Earth formed when a field is plowed.

17. ELUCUBRATE

Elucubrate literally means “to work by candlelight,” but it’s typically used in a looser sense meaning “to work late into the night.” In other words, “to burn the midnight oil.” Someone who does just that is an elucubrator, while the work that you end up producing is an elucubration.

18. EMBUSQUÉ

An embusqué is someone who tries to avoid military service, and in particular, someone who takes a clerical job just to avoid joining up. The word is derived from a French word meaning “to ambush,” in the figurative sense of someone hiding in plain sight.

19. ENANTIOMORPH

The proper word—originally used only in reference to crystallography—for a mirror image or reflection.

20. ENDARKEN

As well as meaning simply “to get dark,” you can use the verb endarken to mean “to obscure” or “to cast a shadow over” something.

21. ENDEMONIASM

The opposite of being divinely inspired is endemoniasm—namely, inspiration from a demon, or from the Devil himself.

22. ENDOLOUR

If you’re endoloured, then you’re consumed by grief.

23. ENSNARL

If something is ensnarled, then it’s tangled up in knots.

24. ENTERCOMMON

An 18th-century word meaning “familiar to, or common to, everyone.”

25. ENTOMOPHOBIA

If you hate insects, you’re entomophobic. It’s one of a number of E-phobias in the language, including eophobia (fear of the dawn), epistolophobia (the hatred of receiving mail), eisoptrophobia (the fear of mirrors or reflections), and enetophobia (hatred of pins).

26. EPANORTHOSIS

When someone stops what they’re saying to go back and change a word to an even stronger one (as in, “I’m very happy—no, ecstatic—to be here”), that’s called epanorthosis. It derived from a Greek word meaning “correction.”

27. EPEXEGESIS

Literally meaning “explain in detail,” an epexegesis is an additional clarifying comment, often tagged onto the end of a more detailed or ambiguous sentence. That is to say, it’s the kind of sentence that often begins, “that is to say.”

28. EQUICRURAL

An isosceles triangle would be an example of an equicrural shape: it literally means “equal-sized legs.”

29. ERYTHROPHYLL

The substance that makes leaves green is of course chlorophyll, but the pigment that takes over in the autumn and makes leaves look red is erythrophyll.

30. EUCATASTROPHE

Coined by JRR Tolkien, a eucatastrophe is the opposite of a catastrophe—a sudden and unexpected event of happiness or good fortune.

31. EUTRAPELY

Derived from Ancient Greek and mentioned in the writings of Aristotle, the word eutrapely or eutrapelia originally referred to ease of conversation, repartee, or someone’s ability to talk to anyone on any subject. By the time it first began to appear in English in the 16th century however, eutrapely had become a more general term meaning “courtesy,” “urbanity,” or “sophistication.”

32. EVENENDWAYS

To move evenendways is to move in an unfaltering straight line, from one place to another.

33. EXCULCATE

While to calcate is to stamp with your heel, to exculcate, derived from the same root, is to trample or tread something down.

34. EXSIBILATION

The word explode originally meant “to jeer a performer off the stage,” but the collective hissing and booing of a dissatisfied audience is called exsibilation.

35. EXTRANEAN

An extranean is a stranger, or someone who does not belong to your family or friends despite being in close proximity to you. The term once referred to pupils who join the school a year later, typically from another school or area.

36. EXTRAVAGE

To wander about with no particular purpose is to extravage.

37. EYE-WATER

Eye-water is just another name for eye lotion or eye-wash, but in 18th-century English it came to refer to weak or watered-down alcohol. Whereas…

38. EYE-OPENER

… an eye-opener, as well as being something surprising or remarkable, was a very strong alcoholic drink in Victorian slang.

39. EYE-SERVANT

A Tudor-period word for an employee (originally a maid or servant) who is only hard working when they’re being observed by their boss.

40. EYEWINK

A 19th-century slang word for an eyelash.

Original Source: 40 Excellent E-Words To Enlarge Your Vocabulary | Mental Floss

¡únete al club!

¡Recibe un correo semanal con la última información, próximos eventos, clases exclusivas y más!

Es GRATIS